KIT | My MAC Vueset Tahiti lipstick palette

MAC Vueset Tahiti palette

In makeup school I got a shitty Kryolan lip palette as part of my basic kit. Kryolan isn’t a bad brand by any means, but for some reason the colours included meant it was virtually impossible to mix a natural brown or pink shade. The formula was also quite sheer and slippery—not good for longevity, especially if you’re doing wedding makeup.

My solution has been to gradually build up the most expensive item in my kit: a custom MAC lipstick palette housed in a Vueset Tahiti container. I picked the Vueset Tahiti because it’s transparent, airtight and incredibly compact, while still fitting a full MAC lipstick in each well.

FACE | The most extra highlighter

Becca Prismatic Amethyst highlighter

The Becca Prismatic Amethyst Highlighter is a duo-chrome lavender highlight powder. Given I barely wear makeup on the daily anymore, let alone a makeup look that warrants highlighter, let alone a makeup look that warrants pearlescent purple highlighter, it’s not the most utilitarian purchase.

Having said all this… I fucking love it. It’s so extra, it’s so unnecessary, but it’s also beautiful. I bought it as a kind-of birthday gift to myself, and because ‘prismatic amethyst’ sounded witchy and mystical and amethyst is my birthstone and even the pattern pressed into the powder is beautiful.

SKIN | Essence of Humanity skincare

Essence of Humanity Nourishing Moisture Cream and Softening Cream Cleanser

With natural skincare brands proliferating in New Zealand it’s sometimes hard to care about new ones—so your brand uses natural plant oils, like every other brand on the market? Congrats.

That’s not the case with Essence of Humanity. They’re a social enterprise, and 100% of the surplus proceeds from their products go to a charitable trust working against poverty. It’s a great concept, especially if you’re not keen on your beauty dollars going to multinationals.

EYES | Real vs fake Anastasia Modern Renaissance Palette

Exteriors of real and fake Anastasia Modern Renaissance palettes
The Anastasia Modern Renaissance palette has to be the most talked-about makeup item of 2016. And since the Anastasia Beverly Hills warehouse was burgled in March, it has been one of the most difficult to buy.

I talked shit on this palette a few months ago and didn’t expect to ever buy it, but then I was shopping on eBay or maybe Aliexpress and found a fake version of it for six dollars. (I wasn’t looking for replica makeup, I promise!)

Naturally, I bought the fake Anastasia Modern Renaissance palette—for research purposes. And after it arrived and I saw what it was like, I felt I owed it to everyone to write a comparison post. (I bought the real palette from Cult Beauty but it is also available on Sephora NZ.)

BODY | The Body Shop shower gels

The Body Shop Shower Gels: Almond and Honey, Pinita Colada, Mango, Strawberry and British Rose

I love The Body Shop. My favourite ever range is the strawberry range—a classic, absolutely-doesn’t-smell-like-real-strawberries scent that reminds me of childhood and never gets old. New scents come out all the time and they’re always great (that Christmas apple one in particular) but nothing will surpass strawberry for me.

That being said… I get spoiled by The Body Shop and always have a queue of Body Shop shower gels to use and I’m not complaining that they don’t keep me in permanent stock of the strawberry one. The latest addition to the stash on the laundry shelf (the shower is in the laundry in my house, weirdly) is Almond Milk and Honey*—actually a shower cream and not a gel.

SKIN | What’s the deal with powder cleanser?

Powder cleanser review - DHC face wash powder, Dermalogica Daily Superfoliant, Clinique Fresh Pressed cleanser, Nude Detox Fizzy Powder Wash

Powder cleansers have come to my attention recently. Dermalogica launched the Daily Superfoliant* as a kind of dialed-up version of their ever-popular Daily Microfoliant, and Clinique’s new Fresh Pressed Vitamin C-based range includes a powder cleanser. Upon remembering I had a bunch of sachets of the Nude Brightening Fizzy Powder Wash that I’d never used either, I figured I should give them all a go and see how I feel about them. Is the powder cleanser format shelf-stable genius or over-complicated moisture magnet?

LIPS | New Antipodes Moisture-Boost natural lipstick

I was telling myself it had been a productive weekend, until I remembered that none of the three-thousand-odd words I’ve written were for Hyacinth Girl and that I haven’t published a blog post for a couple of weeks. So, here I am on Sunday night at 10pm, listening to the ever-enthusiastic Steve1989 open military rations while I write a well-overdue post about Antipodes’ recently relaunched Moisture-Boost natural lipsticks.

Antipodes have had natural lipsticks in their range for years, but last month I was invited to their relaunch where they introduced the refreshed line with an extended range of colours, all named after New Zealand locations.

SKIN | The Ordinary skincare review

The Ordinary skincare products: Vitamin C, Lactic Acid and Alpha Arbutin

I’ve written about products from DECIEM’s NIOD and Hylamide ranges before, but The Ordinary is the line that everyone’s excited about because it’s so goddamn cheap (like, ten New Zealand dollars per bottle). The whole vibe of the Ordinary is offering single-ingredient-focus formulas that can be layered and coordinated into a routine that addresses your skin’s specific concerns.

The entire point of marketing is to tell people what outcomes and benefits a product will give them, and that’s one of the places where The Ordinary are saving their money. The challenge with their ingredient-focus concept for a lot of people is knowing which products to choose. I feel like I have a pretty sound grip on what skincare ingredients are and what they do, but it took me a while of navigating their website and doing some extra research before I decided on the products I wanted to try.

FACE | The Organic Skin Co makeup

The Organic Skin Co is a skincare and makeup brand created by World Organics. Organic skincare isn’t that exciting but seeing an organic beauty company that does base cosmetics is a little less common. I’m used to seeing mineral powder foundations maybe, but The Organic Skin Co does a full range of cosmetics including cream concealers, luminising primers and highlighters, some of which I’ve been sent to review and swatch for you guys. I was really stoked to see the breadth of shades available as well—too often, natural beauty brands offer a pitiful range of colours in base products.

One thing I will say: this brand has the least memorable name possible. I’m surprised they don’t struggle with their SEO, as the name is so generic. I get that it describes what they do, but I was all ready to write a blog post about ‘The Natural Beauty Co’ and then ‘The Organic Beauty Co’ before I realised they were actually called ‘The Organic Skin Co’. Lucky I triple checked!

EYES | How I do my makeup for glasses

I remember having a long and heated argument with an ex-boyfriend about whether wearing fake glasses for fashion purposes was stupid or not (I said it was, he said it wasn’t). That argument isn’t relevant today because although these glasses don’t have my prescription in them, they will very shortly, and I need that prescription to be able to see properly. You don’t see me wearing glasses on my blog that often because it’s hard to take photos without getting reflections in the lenses, but I wear them every day of my life.

The glasses I’m showing off in this post are the Marc Jacobs Havana frames*, a very cool and slightly outside of my comfort zone pair of glasses that have newly come into my life as a gift from Smart Buy Glasses. They’re blue! The longer I’ve worn glasses, the braver I’ve become with the style I wear—I started out with quite a conservative Carter Bond pair before my current default frames from Bailey Nelson.

Despite intending to write this blog post years ago, I’ve never written about how I change my makeup for glasses, so I’m going to do that today!