BODY | How to prepare for laser hair removal

laser hair removal

I have a complex relationship with hair removal, which is something I think I say every time I talk about it. I’ve made a conscious effort not to talk about body hair removal (legs, armpits, pubic hair etc) on Hyacinth Girl anymore. I don’t care about having a hairy body and I don’t want to make other people feel like it matters.

I do, however, shape my eyebrows and remove the hair on my upper lip. It’s a makeup thing, and it’s a confidence thing. I’d rather not have hair on my upper lip, and that’s really all there is to it.

I usually wax or use one of those tiny razors, but I was recently invited to Wellington’s new OFF & ON to try their laser hair removal service. I decided to try it on my upper lip—but when I went in for my consultation, I discovered I hadn’t properly prepared! With that in mind, I wanted to write some guidelines for how to prepare for laser hair removal.

FOTD | The Body Shop Matte Lip Liquid

The Body Shop Matte Lip Liquid FOTD

The three clashing shades of pink in this look made me reconsider posting it, but it’s good to share the things that don’t quite work out as well as your makeup victories, so here we are. I don’t quite know what I was going for, but ended up with a metallic pink eye based around MAC Cranberry eyeshadow, paired with a wonky-liplined Body Shop Matte Lip Liquid* in Goa Magnolia, and a heavy 80s application of blush. And, of course, now that I’ve kind of figured out how to put false lashes on myself, I’m doing it every time I wear makeup.

FACE | Stick foundation is my new crush

Stick foundations Hourglass Vanish stick, Shiseido The Makeup stick foundation, Maybelline Fit Me Foundation stick, NYX Mineral Stick Foundation

Stick foundations are having a real moment and I couldn’t help but investigate them for myself. The second the Hourglass Vanish Seamless Finish Foundation Stick came into Mecca I had to go try it out, and after seeing how nicely it sat on my skin I bought it. The Hourglass stick foundation is bloody expensive and comes with very little product, comparatively, though, so I wanted to see how it compared to a few other stick foundations on the market. Keep in mind that I have a very oily skin type (I thought I was getting it under control for a while, but it’s oily again at the moment), so these recommendations come from that viewpoint.

FACE | Revlon x Chloe Morello Sculpt + Highlight Contour Kit

revlon-sculpt-highlight-chloe-morello

Morgan, where have you been? After a publishing-heavy October, the beginning of November has been a bit chaotic. I worked last-minute on a wedding, I got sick, then this week we got hit by a 7.8 earthquake which was immediately followed by intense weather and flooding. Basically, I haven’t had the time and energy to think about makeup, let alone write about it.

It makes sense to write about the contouring palette Chloe Morello developed with Revlon immediately after the review of her Ciate eyeshadow palette. Chloe’s making bank this year with brand collaborations, for sure, but I was a little lukewarm on the Ciate palette. Let’s see if the Revlon Sculpt + Highlight Contour Kit fares any better.

SKIN | Get amongst these cream cleansers

cream cleansers

If you’re unhappy with your current skincare routine, the one change I would recommend over anything else is switching to a cream cleanser. Dry skin? Perfect. Oily skin? It sounds counter-intuitive, but I promise my oily skin responds so much better to a cream cleanser than a foaming one.

Cleansers spend such little time on your skin, it’s hard to justify spending a lot of money on them. With that in mind, here’s a selection of seven cream cleansers, from cheap to less cheap (and you can buy ALL of them in stores in New Zealand!)

BODY | Christmas at The Body Shop

body-shop-christmas-2016-nz

I don’t do ‘new in’ posts very often. I think they’re a bit boring, frankly, and don’t give me much opportunity to say anything other than ‘this is a new thing a brand sent me that you can spend money on’.

I also don’t write about body care very often, largely because I don’t use it. The hairs on my legs are about 2cm long and my legs haven’t seen moisturiser in probably a year, at least. I’m lazy. I hate taking baths (and I’ve talked about this enough that Lush took me off their PR list).

When it comes to The Body Shop*, however, it’s a little bit different. I love The Body Shop. We go way back—to the time I was four or five and accidentally stole a gift tag from the counter because I thought it was free, and Mum discovered it after we’d left the shop and made me take it back. It’s not all bad memories, though. The Body Shop used to be full of tiny squishy dissolving bath beads in every scent (before I decided I hated baths) and I’d get to pick a little paper bag of them on special occasions. It’s also the perfect destination for difficult Christmas gifts, because the products are genuinely nice, they’re ethically-minded and strike a good balance of affordability and luxury.

It’s a little alarming to be talking about Christmas in October, but it’s coming, so I really have no choice.

HAIR | COLAB is here!

colab dry shampoo

My hair is usually about 30% dry shampoo, and until recently in New Zealand the dry shampoo availability has been limited to Batiste and some random K-Mart brand. I’ve been dying to get my hands on COLAB dry shampoo forever—in part because it’s Ruth Crilly‘s brand, and in part because it’s meant to be great.

I begged Lena to bring me back a can from Australia, and I’d barely had time to use it before I got possibly the most exciting PR email I’ve had for a while: that COLAB dry shampoo is coming to New Zealand! We’re getting the Sheer and Invisible formula, as well as the Extreme Volume one, in the London, New York and Monaco fragrances. I haven’t spotted it in stores yet, but it’s meant to be in select pharmacies and department stores (for $18ish?)

LIFE | Project Pan

Hyacinth Girl project pan

I’ve been thinking about embarking on a Project Pan for a while now. I even filmed a video about it the other week, but after watching it back I hated how I looked in it, so it has since been deleted. You can have that video in word form in this blog post, instead.

Project Pan is where you select a certain number of beauty products with the express intention of ‘panning’ them. Panning can mean either hitting pan, or using them up entirely.

This concept of having to actively try to use a product up runs counter to the average person’s experience of makeup. Most people will have one foundation; they use it until it’s gone, and then buy another one. This is not how it works in the beauty blogging world, and so we have to set our minds to finishing products.

It does highlight the excess of beauty blogging, and that’s why I want to get into it. ‘No-buys’ don’t really work for me, and you’ll know about my recent Depression Hauls. Starting a Project Pan will hopefully help me minimise my makeup collection and rationalise my ‘need’ to buy more.